Interview with Jayson Zaleski: Design Educator and Communication Designer

This week’s Designing for Good Interview is with Jayson Zaleski, a Communication & Design faculty at OCAD University and partner at creative collective Kolor

DF: As a designer, how has design impacted the cause or organization you are involved with?

JZ: Designing for clients, institutions, organizations, and companies that I have worked with in the past has generally brought an additional layer of understanding and focus of these institution’s clients/causes/audiences/research focusses, in part, as a result of the design processes that are implemented within the development of the project. After development, when design research and development has been implemented, the results of the process generally fosters an increased awareness of the issues and people involved as a result of the more strategic and clear-sighted design-related improvements within the overall framework, whether that be aesthetic, communicative, strategic/infrastructural, or programmatic/systems related.

DF: Do you feel that non-profits, social enterprises and grassroots initiatives can survive and compete for attention with the visual branding of large companies?

JZ: I believe that they have adopted many of the branding strategies that corporate institutions have used in order to widen their scope, and this has had both positive and negative impacts. If the name of the game in survival is obtaining as much market share as one can in order to advance one’s cause, then branding and design programs serve the function.

DF: In your opinion, should all designers have some sustainability or social conscious in their practice and philosophy?

JZ: I believe that the definitions surrounding “sustainability” still require more clarification in order for designers to respond accordingly. If, for instance, an industrial designer legally requires only 3 percent of a reclaimed or reused material within a mass produced product to be labelled as “green”, then I think there are gross loopholes within the system. Clarification around many of these topics and definitions, which by the way can be highly polemic, is required in order for all actors involved to be working on a level playing field.

DF: Do you think that a physical storefront (or space or studio) dedicated to offering design services for “good” would be a useful idea?

JZ: Any organization dedicating itself to “doing good” is advisable, and would no doubt positively benefit communities and the social institutions therein.

DF: Are there any non-profits or social causes that you would identify as examples of good design having a positive impact overall? Do you know of any causes, movements, groups or non-profits specifically that lack great design, and could benefit from some assistance should the services be provided?

JZ: One of the most intriguing examples of a design company devoting itself to social causes is a Slovak firm called Dizajnna Kolesach. They have a design program titled “Design on the Wheels” whereby they devote a stated number of weeks per year to exchanging design services for room and board from organizations who cannot pay for professional design services. In their words, “We went to uplift the visual culture of the surrondings of Slovakia with the slogan: ’you pay, we camp’.”

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02 2012

Designing for Good Project Inspiration

The topic of Designing for Good, which focuses on how graphic design can be used for social good, was based on my continued involvement in various non-profit organizations and initiatives.

The spark for all of this was an exposure trip to the developing world, which lead to the formation of ACCESS (a youth-run, non-profit organization focusing on education in developing nations, and inspiring youth activism locally).

This video was made by Kevin Saychareun to profile my involvement with ACCESS, touching on the effect design and being an OCAD University student has on it.

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02

02 2012

Interview with Lee Rose: Nonprofit Communications Professional

This week’s Designing for Good Interview is with Lee Rose, the Editor of CharityVillage.com and Co-founder at MESH Network for Young Nonprofit Professionals in Ottawa.  

DF: As someone who has worked in the non-profit industry, how has design impacted the cause or organization you are involved with?

LR: Design (and a well though-out and executed brand vison and strategy) plays an important role in how my organization connects and engages with its stakeholders, donors, program participants, funders and community partners. It affords us a measure of consistency ‘across platforms’ and ensures that we are ‘speaking from the same song book’ no matter who we are ‘speaking’ to. Well-designed mail pieces bring in more donations. A well-designed and easy to-use website encourages online donations on every single page. A simple logo that can work in a range of situations helps to identify our organization.

DF: What are your thoughts on how your organization would function with poor, default, unthoughtful design and branding?

LR: If our organization stopped paying attention to ‘design’ and our branding, it would have a detrimental effect on our ability to fundraise, promote our programs, engage with our stakeholders and manage our reputation.

DF: Do you feel that non-profits, social enterprises and grassroots initiatives can survive and compete for attention with the visual branding of large companies?

LRAbsolutely. Good branding and design don’t have to cost a lot of money. The best ideas are simple, tied to mission and easy to execute. I would argue that nonprofits, social enterprises and grassroots initiatives are better positioned to design and execute brands that truly reflect their purpose and resonate with their target audiences than larger companies. 

DF: In your opinion, should all designers have some sustainability or social conscious in their practice and philosophy?

LRNo. I am not an advocate for mandated social consciousness or responsibility – doesn’t that negate the entire premise? I would rather see designers do this on their own accord – and build a socially-conscious following that way. It takes one to  lead and then others will follow, when they see the benefit of doing so (benefits can be financial, social, altruistic etc.)

DF: Do you think that a physical storefront (or space or studio) dedicated to offering design services for “good” would be a useful idea?

LR: Yes. However the idea of charging only minimal rates doesn’t jive with me. It’s ok to do good and make money at the same time – despite what the nay sayers might say. By overly-subsidizing services for nonprofits, I think that you will only serve to perpetuate the ‘hand out’ model that plagues the sector. You need to make sure that you recognize the value of your service and price it accordingly – with room to move up or down. Don’t discount the value of your work – if you do it for next to nothing, then it may be perceived as not being as valuable as it really is.

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01 2012

Interview with Jay Wall: Designer, illustrator, and thinker

This week’s Designing for Good Interview is with Jay Wall, a Designer, Illustrator, and Thinker from Toronto. After graduating from Design at York University & Sheridan College, he is currently running Studio Jaywall from the heart of Toronto. Beyond design, Jay makes street art, dodges traffic on his bicycle, and works on community development projects in Guatemala.

DF: As a designer, or someone who has worked in the non-profit industry, how has design impacted the cause or organization you are involved with?

JW: The thoughtful development of visual communication materials is central to the sustainability of all organizations, particularly in the non-profit sector. Design promotes your cause, articulates your mission, clarifies your methods, and builds credibility. It is essential for recruiting newcomers, building their trust through consistency of your brand, and raising support (financial or otherwise).

DF: What are your thoughts on how your organization or project (or one you know of) would function with poor, default, unthoughtful design and branding?

JW: Non-profit organizations are often tight for money, especially in the early days before becoming financially sustainable. The result is usually a branding system (or lack thereof) that is produced hurriedly with little to no budget. This type of design usually misses the mark, not doing justice to the organization. For example: a cliche logo that doesn’t embody the uniqueness of the entrepreneurial idea it attempts to represent; a wordmark with no complimentary identity system to carry across promotional materials; a confusing website that fails to engage visitors; a visually unpolished grant proposal that prevents the organization from receiving thousands of dollars of potential funding.

Design is worth the investment. Putting some money, energy, and serious thought will pay off down the road. An organization with whom I’m involved is increasingly realizing the value of design. The Toronto-based non-profit had been investing minimal amounts of money into web and print design in their first few years. The result is countless “design” pieces (from posters to stickers to newsletters to websites to videos) which on their own do appropriately reflect some aspect of the brand. But they lack the professional touch and – more importantly – cohesion. So I am now working with the organization’s Communications director to bring all these diverse approaches together and establish one clear, strong voice. We will re-visit the logo and then develop an identity system that is consistent while still allowing enough flexibility for the grassroots nature of the organization.

DF: Do you feel that non-profits, social enterprises and grassroots initiatives can survive and compete for attention with the visual branding of large companies?

JW: It is something to aspire to. Most start-ups have less resources than large companies, but they can still take care to invest in high-quality, professional grade design. The critical mass of brand recognition will take a long time to build, but that doesn’t mean that a start-up or non-profit has to look amateur.

DF: In your opinion, should all designers have some sustainability or social conscious in their practice and philosophy?

JW: Ideally, yes. A designer should aspire to bring a social conscience to their work – and every other facet of their life. In a utopian design school, such an ethic would be engrained into the philosophy of teaching design. It wouldn’t be a course to talk about “green design.” Rather, the value of ethical design would be incorporated into every other aspect of a creative education.

Realistically, no. This question has to be understood in context. In a capitalist society, the way things are today, people buy stuff. People buy stuff they don’t need, often with negative consequences to other people and to the environment. It is the designer’s job to convince the consumer that their “need” outweighs any potential consequences – or that negative consequences simply don’t exist (“don’t listen to those damn hippies”).

So what is needed here is not simply the insertion of “socially conscious” lessons into design education, but rather a dramatic cultural and economic shift. I suppose the former is a step in the right direction to bring about such a change.

DF: Do you think that a physical storefront (or space or studio) dedicated to offering design services for “good” would be a useful idea?

JW: Sure, this sounds like a great idea. But with such an emphasis on the physical space, it would be important not to lose sight of the potential of working for remote clients via the web.

A valuable addition to such a studio would be other non-designers on staff or at least easily accessible: other experts in the sector of “good.” For example, strategic consultants, an accountant, a fundraiser, a project manager. These non-design team members would be able to add value to the client’s experience and thus provide a “one stop shop” for a start-up.

In some sense, spaces like the Centre for Social Innovation are already tapping into this market, but with a very different model.

DF: Are there any non-profits or social causes that you would identify as examples of good design having a positive impact overall? Do you know of any causes, movements, groups or non-profits specifically that lack great design, and could benefit from some assistance should the services be provided?

JW: Although this is not an example, a general trend:

Grassroots activist organizations tend to act quickly with no central governance, for example, printing “come to our protest” posters, throwing together websites, and distributing literature. In many cases, the message is inconsistent or unclear, and the public (or other target) only gets a vague sense of what protesters are attempting to communicate. Understandably, such a “lack of great design” is because of the very nature of grassroots groups that may not have a clear mission in the beginning. All the same, I think there is opportunity in rough-around-the-edges activist circles (not just in soft and fuzzy non-profits) to improve “design.” How? I’m not sure. There’s a creative challenge worth thinking about.

Video: Jay Wall’s Advice for Young Designers

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01 2012

Reminding design students to think about designing for social good

After over three months of working on this project, I created 2 posters and put them up on the sixth floor Open Studio in OCAD University. One poster has a quote from Tim Brown and the other a few short statements I wrote to get design students thinking about making a difference with their design – reminding them that designers have a social responsibility to design for good.

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11 2011

Creating the website

Throughout the fall of 2011, DesigningForGood.ca will be under development.

Updates are being posted periodically as research continues.

Thanks for visiting.

daniel@atdesignschool.com

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08 2011